23 May

A Letter From The Past

This is a guest post by Kim of So Many Places. She reminds us that, often, our dreams have been with us for a long time; we just have to take the time to listen.

Pen and Paper

Photo Credit: Ramunas Geciauskas

 

Last weekend my husband Brian was out of town and I planned a few days of alone time with me, myself and I. I cleaned the house, made an unrealistic list of 8 million things to accomplish, and then set about crossing things off the list. Oh how I love a good To Do list! But somewhere between “make homemade soup” and “write 3 query letters” I began to understand that what I really wanted to do with my quiet time was reflect. Yeah, I was in one of those moods.

So I pulled the ladder in from the garage and made my way up to the attic where I dusted off the Rubbermaid container that holds my old journals and pictures from high school and college. Then I poured myself a big ol’ glass of wine and spent the remaining hours of the day thumbing through my past.

Shoved into the back of one of my journals I found a letter I had written to myself ten years ago when I was in college. I’d gone on some kind of retreat and we’d been tasked with writing a letter to ourselves that would be mailed to us one year into the future. It was nothing I ever would have done on my own and I’d completely forgotten about it. I’d probably received it, read it once, and then shoved it into the back of that journal never to be read again.

So you can imagine my surprise when I rediscovered it. And though most of what I was writing about at that time was a cringe-worthy montage of boys and parties the letter was sort of insightful.

And it made me realize that I’ve been dreaming of, and struggling with, the same things for a very long time. I’ve said on my own blog that I’ve always known what I wanted to do but I’ve also always lacked the belief that going for my dreams was possible, or at the very least, responsible.

Here is an excerpt of the advice I gave myself at 19, sitting against a tree in the springtime under the bright stars of southeastern Ohio:

Be true to yourself! Listen to that inner voice, feed it, never lose it. Stay passionate and write things down. You may not be good with the spoken word but you can still get through to others. Write it down and set it free! (Kim’s note: at that time in my life I had a horrific fear of public speaking. I just simply could not do it without panicking).

There are many journeys to come, so many that you can’t even begin to imagine. Don’t hold yourself back, which you are guilty of sometimes. You do a great job believing in others- go ahead and believe in yourself.”

I read the letter a few times. Then I curled up on the couch and I wrote back to my 19-year-old self. I told her that I had received her letter and that it was beautiful and it meant a lot to me. And I told her that she was right, things had happened in her life that she could have never imagined. I told her that her life was bigger than she had dreamed and that there was a peace in her that she wouldn’t have believed possible. And I told her that she had given me permission all of those years ago to believe in myself, and that it had been a long road, but I wanted her to know that, finally, I do.

Then I wrote my ten-years-into-the-future self a letter. I told her that I wished her bravery and clarity and joy. I told her I was excited to meet her some day and that I hoped she’d have what she dreamed of. And then I told her that I loved her and I sealed the letter up and stuck it into the back of the journal, where it sits today and where, one day, I’ll discover it again and marvel at how far I’ve come.

About The Author: Kim is a writer in Portland, Oregon. She and her husband are in the process of selling their things and quitting their jobs so that she can (finally!) follow her dreams of writing and traveling. Kim writes about her journey at www.So-Many-Places.com. You can also find her on Twitter @rtwsomanyplaces or on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SoManyPlacesTravelBlog

 

19 May

Walking The Talk

3381 Steps on the Poon Hill Trek

Jason and I went to a party this past weekend where we didn’t know more than 5 of the hundred or so other revelers that also attended.

On the drive home we saw a fellow limping along side his bike as he approached a long hill so we stopped to see if we could help out. He had twisted his knee and, unable to ride, was resorting to hitch-hiking to get home to Calgary. We rearranged our belongings, stuffed his bike in the back and drove him the three hours home.

This comes on the heels of seeing a tweet on Twitter the other week from a UK couple who were coming to Canada to start a 5 month bike tour in Calgary along with their 2 year old son. I asked if they had a place to stay and, when they said no, offered to pick them up from the airport and give them a place to work through the jetlag.

One of the greatest things we learned, while we were traveling, is that people are generally kind and want to help out. Having been treated so well during our time away we vowed that when we returned we would step out further and help others.

We talked about it a lot; how we would join the Couchsurfing community, try to meet some of the people we’ve know online, and generally just expose ourselves to meeting more interesting people. But it’s easy to stay wrapped up in our little cocoon.

Like any great movement our talk finally reached the tipping point and the time came to start walking the talk.

Jason and I are a little on the introverted side and, while I love being around people and in the center of the action, I also love just being alone and watching the world go by. I find small talk difficult and would rather be doing something that leads to conversation rather than just trying to have a conversation.

I read somewhere once that in order for change to happen the pain of being where you are has to be greater than the pain of change. I like it. Of course pain is relative and, in this case, is definitely not physical! But I had decided that I wanted to step out more and reached a point where I would be angry with myself if I looked back later and regretted that I hadn’t tried harder.

The tweet from Becki came at just the right time and I fired off an invitation before I had a chance to think. Quite frankly I was relieved when she didn’t reply as I had no idea how it was going to work with the three of them in our small apartment. And then, the night before they were to fly, she emailed asking if the invitation was still open. Well, I couldn’t say no at that point could I? And I’m so glad I didn’t! They are a lovely couple and, despite their crippling jetlag, we had some marvelous chats about stepping out and adventure and seeing your dreams come true. They are nearing Vancouver now on their epic bike trip and are themselves walking the talk and pushing themselves every day.

The party invitation was a generous inclusion to a marvelous 40th birthday party of someone we have only met a few times. Gathering close to a hundred of her family and friends Anita hosted a weekend to remember. We entered knowing only a few people but left with a hundred new friends. Everyone was super friendly and would simply walk up, introduce themselves, tell us how they knew Anita and asked us about our story. Amazing. We had a fabulous time and were honored to be part of Anita seeing her dream come true. No, not turning 40 silly! Anita arranged the party to have her favorite singer Valdy perform for her. A long time dream that she made happen…but more on that another day.
And finding Dillon on the side of the road was serendipitous. Having just spent the weekend in the company of kindness and being newly intrigued about bike touring it wasn’t hard to stop and see what was up. Not only were we able to help him out but he turned out to be one terribly interesting fellow. Having traveled to many of the places that we have and with an outlook on life that favors gathering experiences rather than possessions, our conversation was easy and varied as we rolled over the foothills back home.

And so we will keep trying to walk the talk. It still won’t be easy but we have some early wins that will keep us wanting to step out of our comfort zone to learn more about people and selfishly enrich our own experiences.

 

 

 

 

 

16 May

How To Handle Naysayers And Would-Be Dream Slayers

This is a guest post by Michelle of Wicked Whimsy. Here, she helps us manage those times when we step out and tell others of our exciting plans only to be met with misunderstanding and negative feedback. I am lucky to have had experienced almost no negativity with my plans, but I also don’t make room for it; if I feel it coming I use many of the tips that Michelle outlines below.

Get Creative!

Photo Credit: JD Hancock

 

We’ve all experienced it; we share a dream with someone, eyes alight with excitement, only to watch the other person sniff in disdain and say something akin to “Well, that’s not very realistic, is it?”

If you’re not prepared, this can be a crushing blow to both you and your dream. Dealing with people who would slay your dreams with one fell swoop can be frustrating, confusing, and heartbreaking, if you let it be. And it probably won’t ever be easy, especially if those naysayers are close friends or family. However, there’s a few tips and tricks that can make it easier on you, and less likely to impact the way you view your dreams.

With Compassion

The first thing you’ll want to remember is that most people react that way to other peoples’ dreams because of the way they think about their own dreams. The person who is fast to pooh-pooh the ambitions of others is very rarely acting on any of their own ambitions or dreams. Since they aren’t valuing their own dreams, you can hardly expect them to value yours.

The other reason many people react that way, especially people who care about you, is that they’re trying to protect you. Misguided though it may be, they think that surely things will be easier on you now if you just give this dream up, instead of trying it and possibly failing. They don’t want to see you get hurt, so they’re trying to prevent it.

When you remember that these two things are the motivation for the way most people react, it’s a lot easier to avoid getting riled up or upset, and to stay calm instead.

With Firmness & Calmness

The best way to react to these conversations is by staying firm and calm. If you aren’t firm with the naysayer, chances are they’ll take that as an invitation to further try and convince you of their viewpoint. You might think you’re being polite, but responding with something like “Oh, why do you say that?” will only further the conversation, which isn’t going to help you out at all.

Instead, respond firmly and calmly, and change the subject afterwards, making it clear that you don’t want to talk about it any more. If they bring it up again, remain calm & say “I don’t want to talk about it”, then ask them a question. People love to talk about themselves, and bringing up their favorite subject makes them less likely to try and change the subject back again.

Avoid Them

This is certainly a last result, and it doesn’t work in all situations, but it’s worth considering. If nothing else works, and if the person insists on attempting to be a negative influence, avoid them entirely, or at least the subject. Ask them questions before they get a chance to ask you questions, have a mental list of “safe topics” that you both agree on, but make sure that if you’re talking to them, you won’t have to talk about whatever dream it is they’re intent on slaying.

And if that doesn’t work, make them not a part of your life any longer. Stop talking to them or interacting with them. Even if this person is someone you have a relationship (of any kind) with, if they’re constantly dogging your dreams, consider ending the relationship. Life is short, too short to be surrounded by un-supportive people!

How do you deal with naysayers & would-be dream slayers?

About The Author: Michelle is a 22 year old rainbow haired writer & blogger, who writes at Wicked Whimsy, at the intersection of creativity, aesthetics, productivity, & personal development. She recently released Build Your Own Castle, a free interactive guide for getting yourself together.

09 May

Coming Home: One Year Later

Looking Toward Home After A Year Away

I didn’t know how I would feel about coming home. I didn’t know how it would feel to be home for one week, or one month, or five months, or half a year, or even a year.

It’s now been a year since we returned to Canada.

I thought that I would be more nostalgic over the year; keep looking back and remembering where we were at a particular point. But I haven’t been, really.

I’m not a sentimentalist so I’m not entirely surprised by this, although I did think that a big event such as travelling around the world for a year might elicit a little more emotion.

Not that I haven’t been wistful. And I have felt plenty of envy and jealousy; sometimes unable to read other peoples stories or even look at my own pictures.

If wanderlust is an emotion then it is what has occupied my heart.

It’s been a good year.

I’ve always thought of coming home as part of the journey; it’s a part I looked forward to, and have enjoyed.

The trip has left a legacy with me; one of power, confidence and trust that permeates everything I do now.

I do nothing but look forward to the future. We have a goal in mind and a plan to make it happen that has already seen its’ first steps realized.

Life is good…go ahead, take your own OneGiantStep…you’ll see what I mean.

 

02 May

A Local’s Windy City Food Tour

This is a guest post by Kim of To Uncertainty And Beyond. She takes us on a mouthwatering tour of her home town, Chicago. Belly up to the bar and be prepared to feast your eyes!

Visitors to Chicago are bombarded with glorious, calorie filled food options. There’s pizza, hot dogs, fried chicken, and great bars on every corner! (Not to mention the great dessert options!)

While there are also wonderful healthy, fresh, vegetarian, vegan, and high-end places. I thought it would be more fun to focus on the “bad for you” places that I know and love. I’ve lived in Chicago for about 6 year and have made it a priority to seek out and find the best of the best in lots of different cuisines. Hopefully my hard work (and hard eating) will help you on your next visit to the Windy City!

Deep Dish Pizza

A Chicago style pizza is deep dish, stuffed with ingredients, and lots of cheese. It’s served in what looks like a round cake pan and the buttery crust is usually about 3 inches tall. each pizza takes about 35-45 minutes to bake, so order a beer, an appetizer, and be ready to wait!

deep dish at lou malnati's

The original deep dish is said to have been invented by the guys at Gino’s East. So, that is always a popular place to go. It’s good, but always really crowded and packed with tourists. You’ll find lots of variations of Deep Dish pizza in the city. My tip? Head to Lou Malnati’s or Pequod’s for the best pizza in town.

Lou Malnati’s is one of the most popular chains in the city, and for good reason. Their pizza crust is crunchy, the ingredients are fresh, and the sauce full of flavor. Also try the Malnatti salad. Yum! Pequod’s is famous for it’s “caramelized” cheese crust. To me, it almost tastes burned, but it does have an interesting flavor. There are only two locations, but Pequod’s definitely holds its own up against the big chains.

Lou Malnati’s Locations:

  • South Loop: 805 S. State Street (near the Harrison Red Line stop)
  • River North: 439 North Wells Street (near the Merchandise Mart Brown Line stop)
  • Lincoln Park: 958 W. Wrightwood (near the Diversey Brown Line stop)

Pequod’s Location:

  • Lincoln Park: 2207 N. Clybourn Ave (15 minute walk from Armitage Brown Line stop)
  • Morton Grove: 8520 Fernald Ave Morton Grove Il (out in the burbs, you have to drive)

Gino’s East:

  • Downtown: 633 North Wells Street (near Grand Red Line stop or Chicago Brown Line stop)
  • Northwestern Campus: 162 East Superior Street (near Chicago Red Line stop)

Hot Dogs

Chicagoans don’t hesitate to line up and wait for the best hot dogs in the city. A Chicago- style hot dog is made with very specific ingredients. It begins with a boiled all-beef frank placed on a steamed poppyseed bun. This basic dog is topped with diced onion, bright neon green pickle relish, yellow mustard, tomato wedge, a pickle spear, and a hot pepper. Do not ask for ketchup, it does not belong on a Chicago dog. You will likely be ridiculed by the employees and fellow diners if you order ketchup.

You can get a fairly decent hot dog pretty much anywhere in the city. Make sure you look for the signs of a higher quality dog like the all-beef frank and poppyseed bun! If you want a higher class hot dog, give Hot Doug’s or Franks ‘n Dawgs a try. You’ll pay a lot more, but get a gourmet hot dog experience. Be prepared to wait in line for at least 45 minutes at Hot Doug’s. Especially on the weekend when he’s serving up his famous duck fat fries!

Hot Dog stand locations:

Fried Chicken

Harold’s Chicken Shack is the place to go for fried chicken in Chicago. This joint originated on the south side in the 1950’s and many of the original locations will take your order and hand your chicken over from behind bullet proof glass. It is the “dive bar” of the chicken world and it’s tasty!

The chicken is fried to order in a half beef tallow and half vegetable oil to give it a unique taste. If you’re craving some good, old fashioned, southern fried chicken. Harold’s is for you!

You can also find the southern delicacy of chicken and waffles in Chicago. The best place to go is on the south side as well, Chicago’s Home of Chicken and Waffles. How can you pass up a delicately crispy waffle topped with a peice of mouthwateringly juicy fried chicken and maple syrup? Doesn’t sound good? It’s not just good, it’s AMAZING.

Chicken n Waffles

Harold’s downtown locations:

  • South Loop: 636 South Wabash Avenue (near Harrison Red Line stop)
  • West Loop: 518 W Harrison (near Clinton Blue Line stop)
  • West Loop: 804 West Washington Boulevard (Near Clinton Green Line stop)

Chicago’s Home of Chicken and Waffles: 3947 S King Dr (near the Indiana Green Line stop, but driving is also a good option)

Beer

Chicagoans have access to some great locally brewed beer from bigger companies like Goose Island to the smaller Half Acre brewery as well as microbreweries from Wisconsin and Michigan. You can find restaurants and bars with lists so extensive that it makes your head spin.

Chicago is a great place for a beer-tasting night out with friends!

Bar and Brewery locations:

Dessert

I love dessert. Who doesn’t? Chicago also has some amazing places to tempt your sweet tooth. The best frozen custard in the midwest (believe me, I’ve nearly tried them all) can be found at Scooter’s Frozen Custard. If you’ve never had frozen custard, it’s a must when visiting Chicago. It’s a thick, creamy, version of ice cream that is just too darn good to pass up. Fozen custard joints only offer vanilla or chocolate. However, you can choose from a plethora of ingredients for concretes, which is a better version of a blizzard.

Another great ice cream option is The Original Rainbow cone, which has been a Chicago institution since 1926. They have thier unique rainbow cone as well as other yummy options.

If ice cream isn’t your think you can go the baked route. Chicago has some wonderul bakeries serving up cupcakes, cookies, cakes, sweet bread, muffins, and my personal favorite, pies.

Hoosier Mama pies is quickly becoming the hottest spot for dessert in the city. They serve up amazing sweet and savory pies with perfect crusts and fresh ingredients.

Locations for great sweets:

  • Scooter’s Frozen Custard: 1658 West Belmont Avenue (10 minute walk from Belmont Brown Line stop)
  • Original Rainbow Cone: 9233 S Western Ave (driving is your best option)
  • Original Rainbow Cone: Loop – 177 N State St (State/Lake Brown, Orange, Green Line stops, Lake Red Line stop)
  • Hoosier Mama Pie Company: 1618 1/2 Chicago Avenue (15 minute walk from Chicago Blue Line stop)
  • Molly’s Cupcakes: 2536 North Clark Street (take bus 22 or 36)
  • Bake: 2246 W North Ave (near Damen Blue Line stop)
  • Sweet Mandy B’s: 1208 W Webster Ave (10 minute walk from Fullerton Red Line stop)

Great eats in Chicago

Visitors to Chicago are bombarded with glorious, calorie filled food options. There’s a

pizza, hot dog, fried chicken, or a great bar on every corner! (Not to mention the great

dessert options!) While there are also wonderful healthy, fresh, vegetarian, vegan, and

high-end places. I thought it would be more fun to focus on the “bad for you” places that I

know and love. I’ve lived in Chicago for about 6 year and have made it a priority to seek

out and find the best of the best in lots of different cuisines. Hopefully my hard work (and

hard eating) will help you on your next visit to the Windy City!

Pizza

A Chicago style pizza is deep dish, stuffed with ingredients, and lots of cheese. It’s

served in what looks like a round cake pan and the buttery crust is usually about 3 inches

tall. each pizza takes about 35-45 minutes to bake, so order a beer and be ready to wait!

The orignal deep dish is said to have been invented by the guys at Gino’s East. So, that is

always a popular place to go. It’s good, but always really crowded and packed with tourists.

You’ll find lots of variations of Deep Dish pizza in the city. My tip? Skip Giordano’s (a

favorite for some reason) and head to Lou Malnati’s or Pequod’s. Lou Malnati’s is one of the

most popular chains in the city, and for good reason. Their pizza crust is crunchy, the

ingredients are fresh, and the sauce full of flavor. Also try the Malnatti salad. Yum!

Pequod’s is famous for it’s “caramelized” cheese crust. To me, it almost tastes burned, but

it does have an interesting flavor. There are only two locations, but Pequod’s definitely

holds its own up against the big chains.

Lou Malnati’s Locations:
South Loop: 805 S. State Street (near the Harrison Red Line stop) – MUCH LESS CROWDED
River North: 439 North Wells Street (near the Merchandise Mart Brown Line stop)
Lincoln Park: 958 W. Wrightwood (near the Diversey Brown Line stop)

Pequod’s Location:
Lincoln Park: 2207 N. Clybourn Ave (15 minute walk from Armitage Brown Line stop)
Morton Grove: 8520 Fernald Ave Morton Grove Il (out in the burbs, you have to drive)

Gino’s East:
Downtown: 633 North Wells Street (near Grand Red Line stop or Chicago Brown Line stop)
Northwestern Campus: 162 East Superior Street (near Chicago Red Line stop)

Hot Dogs

Chicagoans don’t hesitate to line up and wait for the best hot dogs in the city. A Chicago-

style hot dog is made with very specific ingredients. It begins with a boiled all-beef frank

placed on a steamed poppyseed bun. This basic dog is topped with diced onion, bright neon

green pickle relish, yellow mustard, tomato wedge, a pickle spear, and a hot pepper. Do not

ask for ketchup, it does not belong on a Chicago dog. You will likely be ridiculed by the

employees and fellow diners if you order ketchup.

You can get a fairly decent hot dog pretty much anywhere in the city. Make sure you look for

the signs of a higher quality dog like the all-beef frank and poppyseed bun! If you want a

higher class hot dog, give Hot Doug’s or Franks ‘n Dawgs a try. You’ll pay a lot more, but

get a gourmet hot dog experience. Be prepared to wait in line for at least 45 minutes at Hot

Doug’s. Especially on the weekend when he’s serving up his famous duck fat fries!

Hot Dog stand locations:
Hot Doug’s: 3324 North California Avenue (Not really near the L, take a cab)
Jim’s Original Hot Dog: 1250 South Union Avenue (15 minute walk from Roosevelt Red Line

stop)
Portillo’s: 100 W Ontario St (Near the Grand Red Line stop)
Flub a Dub Chub’s: 3021 N Broadway (Near the Wellingtong Brown Line stop)
Superdawg: 6363 N. Milwaukee Avenue, Chicago, IL (really far out there, you have to drive)
Franks ‘n Dawgs: 1863 N Clybourn (Near Armitage Brown Line stop)

Fried Chicken

Harold’s chicken Shack is the place to go for fried chicken in Chicago. This joint

originated on the south side in the 1950’s and many of the original locations will take your

order and hand your chicken over from behind bullet proof glass. It is the “dive bar” of the

chicken world and it’s good! The chicken is fried to order in a half beef tallow and half

vegetable oil to give it a unique taste. If you’re craving some good, old fashioned,

southern fried chicken. Harold’s is for you!

You can also find the southern delicacy of Chicken and Waffles in Chicago. The best place to

go is on the south side as well, Chicago’s Home of Chicken and Waffles. How can you pass up

a delicately crispy waffle topped with a peice of mouthwateringly juicy fried chicken and

maple syrup? Doesn’t sound good? It’s not just good, it’s AMAZING.

Harold’s locations:
South Loop: 636 South Wabash Avenue (near Harrison Red Line stop)
West Loop: 518 W Harrison (near Clinton Blue Line stop)
West Loop: 804 West Washington Boulevard (Near Clinton Green Line stop)

Chicago’s Home of Chicken and Waffles: 3947 S King Dr (near the Indiana Green Line stop, but

driving is also a good option)

Beer

Chicagoans have access to some great locally brewed beer from bigger companies like Goose

Island to the smaller Half Acre brewery as well as breweries from Wisconsin and Michigan.

You can find some restaurants and bars with beer lists so extensive that it makes your head

spin. Chicago is a grea3t place for a beer-tasting night out with friends!

Half Acre Brewery: 4257 N. Lincoln Ave (near Montrose Brown Line stop)
Goose Island Beer Co: 1800 N Clybourn Ave (near North/Clybourn Red Line stop)
Revolution Brewing: 1800 N Clybourn Ave (near California Blue Line stop)

Bars with Great Beer Lists:
Hopleaf Bar: 5148 North Clark Street (15 minute walk from Berwyn Red Line stop)
Map Room: 1949 N Hoyne Ave (10 minute walk from Western Blue Line stop)
Villains: 649 South Clark Street (near Harrison Red Line stop)
Clark Street Ale House: 742 N Clark St (near Chicago Red Line stop)

Dessert

I love dessert. Who doesn’t? Chicago also has some amazing places to tempt your sweet tooth.

The best frozen custard in the midwest (believe me, I’ve nearly tried them all) can be found

at Scooter’s Frozen Custard. If you’ve never had frozen custard, it’s a must when visiting

Chicago. It’s a thick, creamy, version of ice cream that is just too darn good to pass up.

Fozen custard joints only offer vanilla or chocolate. However, you can choose from a

plethora of ingredients for concretes, which is a better version of a blizzard. Another

great ice cream option is The Original Rainbow cone, which has been a Chicago institution

since 1926. They have thier unique rainbow cone as well as other yummy options.

If ice cream isn’t your think you can go the baked route. Chicago has some wonderul bakeries

serving up cupcakes, cookies, cake, sweet bread, muffins, and my personal favorite, PIES.

Hoosier Mama pies is quickly becoming the hottest spot for dessert in the city. They serve

up amazing sweet and savory pies with perfect crusts and fresh ingredients.

Scooter’s Frozen Custard: 1658 West Belmont Avenue (10 minute walk from Belmont Brown Line

stop)
Original Rainbow Cone: 9233 S Western Ave (waaaay out there, you should drive. It’s a cute

shop though!)
Rainbow Cone: Loop – 177 N State St (State/Lake Brown, Orange, Green Line stops, Lake Red

Line stop)
Hoosier Mama’s: 1618 1/2 Chicago Avenue (15 minute walk from Chicago Blue Line stop)
Molly’s Cupcakes: 2536 North Clark Street (take bus 22 or 36)
Bake: 2246 W North Ave (near Damen Blue Line stop)
Sweet Mandy B’s: 1208 W Webster Ave (10 minute walk from Fullerton Red Line stop)

?

About The Author: Kim quit her job in 2010 to travel the world. She and her husband Clark went on a crazy eight month journey around the world. They visited more than 20 countries! Their blog To Uncertainty and Beyond features tips for travel, budget, food, culture, photography, videos and more! Follow them on twitter @2UNB.